A Year of Creating Dangerously, Day 228: Cottage Creativity, Part 3

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Monique painting on Lac Joly, Quebec – Photo by Zoe Kok

For my last installment of Cottage Creativity, I present a small gallery of small paintings done by my wife, Monique.

I have posted about her ability to translate the large landscape to the small canvas before. She worked that magic again this time ’round at the cottage. But she also put some of the small flora around the cottage to canvas, too.

The largest canvas here is 4″ by 5″ while the smallest is only 2″ by 2″. All were done en plein air. Monique has again given us proof that fine art doesn’t have to come in large packages.

As a bonus, see if you can spot the little guest making an appearance in the painting below…

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A Year of Creating Dangerously, Day 195: Little Big Painting

Little big painting 2

“Size matters not. Judge me by my size do you?” To get your point across, Yoda you quote.

My wife Monique is a wonderful artist. She is an inspiration to me and the perfect partner to turn to when you need a suggestion to help your own artwork¬†work. I can’t tell you how many times she’s given me advice on a piece I’m working on and it is exactly what that piece needed. Her artistic sensibility is just one of the many, many reasons I am a very blessed man.

We have a few of her artworks around our house. Someday I’ll get to sharing more of those, but for today I share one of my favorites. It is one of her “Little Big Paintings” as I’ve come to call them. In a beautifully impressionistic style, she has done a few landscapes on a small scale. The one I share today is a scene across the lake from our friends’ cottage in Quebec. If you’ve spent anytime at a cottage in Ontario or Quebec, the image in this painting will instantly bring you back there. I love it because I love that place and I love her, too.

So my simple post for today is Monique’s ability to translate something big into something small yet retain all the beauty and grandeur of that scene. To me, it is a sign of an exceptional painter who doesn’t need to wow you with an gigantic canvas to draw you in and transport you somewhere else.

I’ve encouraged her to do more of these! Here’s hoping she does.

Little big painting